Do You: Our Guide to Writing Your Own Job Description
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Do You: Our Guide to Writing Your Own Job Description

YOUR LIFE ISNT EASILY CATEGORIZED OR DEFINED SO WHY SHOULD YOU ASSUME YOUR CAREER SHOULD BE? 

One way to engage your inner entrepreneurial spirit in a traditional working environment is to write your own job description. And we don’t mean for the job you currently have—we mean for the job you want that doesn’t presently exist.

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT

This isn’t about getting promoted, it’s about tapping into the self-starter in you to pave the way for something different at your organization. It’s about channeling creativity in a workplace that may not allow for much of it, creating space for something new, something different, and something that challenges the status quo. Maybe your new job won’t be accepted, but it’s pretty much a guarantee that showing this level of commitment to the organization will be rewarded in some way.

This is about channeling creativity in a workplace that may not allow for much of it, creating space for something that challenges the status quo.

HOW TO DO IT

  • Decide what is is that you want to do. And make sure you are minding your values. Without them, there will be no underlying purpose to what you’re doing (and here’s how to find your purpose if you need help!). {click to tweet}
  • Determine how the new position will help support corporate goals and objectives. You’ve got to give the organization a reason to believe that what you are doing will move the needle in terms of driving the organization forward. They’ve existed this long without a position like this, so why should they consider including it now?
  • Plan for your replacement. Provide recommendations as to what should be done to backfill your position. Consider the possibility of hanging on to a few of your current responsibilities and making your (hopefully) former position part-time (hint: this is how they will save money while still giving you additional compensation!).
  • Break the job description into four parts: summary, responsibilities, qualifications, and competencies. These are the four standard components of every job description—so make sure all are included. To sell them that you’re the right person for this position, take some highlights from your last performance review as your key competencies, and make sure they’re listed under the new job description.
  • Get the green-light from your mentor. Hopefully, by now you have a mentor you trust who can provide you with feedback. Getting her insight is key not only for the content of what you’re about to pitch but for her endorsement as well.

NOW WHAT?

Regardless of what’s happened as a result of your pitch, please please follow up with a thank you note. Not a thank you email, a thank you note. Include in your correspondence how grateful you are for the opportunity to be heard and how satisfied you are working in an organization that promotes a culture of open dialogue.

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Did you ever write your own job description? Tell us about it in the comments.