5 Recruiting Myths That Are Blowing Your Job Search Game

5 Recruiting Myths That Are Blowing Your Job Search Game
by Audrey Okulick
September 19, 2016
Ever wonder what it's like to use a recruiter in your job search? Probably nothing like what you'd expect.
If you've ever wondered what it's like to work with a recruiter during a job search, you're not alone. That's why we asked the fashion and creative recruiting agency, Workshop LA, to break down a few rampant myths that just aren't true. 

1. Using a recruiter costs money so why bother?

This is probably the number one most common question people have, which I always think is surprising. In simple terms, the company hiring foots the bill, and it’s the recruiter’s job to do the prescreening, initial interviews, and all reference checking. Companies hire recruiters when they either don’t have the time, resources, or (let's face it) connections to find the right candidate for a job. Recruiters then use their network to make a match and send over the candidates they deem as a fit. But here's the point: it’s free for the job seeker so don’t be afraid to try it.

2. Recruiters only care about their own commission, and not about placing you in the right job

This is half-myth, half-truth. The reality of it is, recruiters do make money off placing you in a job. However, a good recruiter (ahem) wants you in the right job where you are happy, the company is happy, and it’s a long-lasting fit. Some recruiters will place you in a job, and you’ll never hear from them again. A good one will keep in touch, and maybe you’ll even hire them to help grow your current team. That’s our goal at least—to pay it forward.
I personally remember everything about my first interaction with a candidate—if they were 10 minutes late, chewed gum, brought a Red Bull into the interview, reeked of cigarette smoke...

3. Always up your current salary, no one will ever know

This is the worst idea of all time. The first thing to know is recruiters will always verify your current salary with your previous employer. Always. And if it’s after you’ve accepted an offer, this could pull your offer off the table. We also keep a record of every time you tell us your current salary. So let's say you speak to a recruiter, and say you currently make 65k. Then a month later we call you, and you say you make 80k. It’s all a little fishy and makes you look untrustworthy, not to mention unprofessional. Just be honest. We will get you the most amount of money possible. Because if you make more, we make more, too.

4. No one really calls references so who you list is not important

Big mistake here. We always call references. Sometimes, we'll even call people who you don’t list as a reference if something seems off, and ask about why you left a previous job. If the facts don’t add up, we have a problem. This is another important reminder to always be truthful about your past roles (and why you left them) and tell us why if you don’t want us to call previous employers. Was your boss a bully? Does your old company have a notoriously high turnover and everyone in the industry knows? No problem. Just tell us so we don’t have to call someone that has less than stellar things to say about you, because we will ultimately have to tell the company looking to hire you.

5. Interviews with recruiters aren’t real interviews

Nope again. Always put your best foot forward whether it’s a phone or in-person meeting with a recruiter. I personally remember everything about my first interaction with a candidate—if they were 10 minutes late, chewed gum, brought a Red Bull into the interview, reeked of cigarette smoke. All are no-no’s and will not leave a good taste in a recruiter’s mouth—especially, literally the cigarette smoke. We would not send you to a client after any of this, so you’ve already wasted everyone’s time. In a first interview with a recruiter remember these simple rules: always bring your resume, be on time (not too early, not too late), no cigs before or drinks in the meeting, and follow up with a thank-you note. These things may seem obvious, but you’d be surprised.
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Got any other questions about working with a recruiter? The team at Workshop LA is happy to answer them in the comments.