I Took the Job for the Money—And I Don't Regret It

I Took the Job for the Money—And I Don't Regret It
We're trained to believe money isn't everything—but ever noticed just how much of your life it actually affects?
There are a lot of things to consider when contemplating leaving your current job and accepting a new one. One of the biggest factors people don’t want to admit: more money.

Money is a tough subject. It is one of the topics of discussion you never bring up at a dinner party, along with politics and religion. But, let’s face it, we all need it. Money makes the world go round. Sometimes (read: almost always), money is the make or break element when it comes to hard decisions.
Even though the main motivation for getting a new job was salary related, it didn’t change the fact that I was an overall happier person.
After working at a stressful job for two years, I realized that I wasn’t making enough money to justify the hours and the strain. I could certainly survive on my salary, but I wanted more responsibility, more structure, and more money, especially considering I was working over 55 hours per week. I no longer wanted to spend my entire day in meaningless meetings, talking about projects that I didn’t necessarily believe were right for our team or for me.

CAREER CHANGING DECISIONS—AND A JOB SEARCH

I decided to start looking for a new job that would take me away from an agency to a corporate environment, as well as provide me with a fresh start, and, honestly, a fatter wallet. I searched for openings with larger companies in my area that I knew paid quite well. I went on interviews for positions that sounded somewhat interesting, that had clear salary ranges.

Ultimately, I accepted a new job that offered me over $10,000 more per year. I was ready for a new challenge at a new company, but if I’m being honest, I was more excited to have some extra money each month to put towards debt, savings, and my wardrobe. When my first paycheck came, I finally bought some black pumps I had been eyeing for months but thought were too expensive. After a few months of getting the larger paycheck, I paid off my car seven months in advance. I built up my savings and was able to pay for a vacation to Mexico to celebrate a friend’s wedding without worrying about where I was going to get the cash. Money, ultimately, made a big difference in my quality of life and general sense of wellbeing.

$10,000: WHAT A SALARY RAISE REALLY MEANS

As far as the job was concerned, I really enjoyed the change of pace, the fact that I wasn’t in meetings all day, every day, and that the other employees worked hard during the day so they could leave at a reasonable time to be at home with their families. But it was not my dream job by any stretch of the imagination. Even though the main motivation for getting a new job was salary related, it didn’t change the fact that I was an overall happier person. I was working fewer hours and experiencing less stress in all parts of my life.

There’s an inherent shame around focusing on money. We skirt talking about it, even with our closest friends. But like most things, when we admit that it factors into our lives, we feel more empowered. We’re able to think and talk more clearly about what we want, our professional goals, and our personal direction. I don’t have any regrets about taking a new job solely based on the money. It isn’t everything, but it is a large part of your day-to-day life and your job. I was unhappy and money solved more issues than I can describe. It was one of the best things I’ve done.

Have you ever taken a job for the money? Any regrets? And hey, while you're at it, read our article on when to walk away from more money.