Are These REALLY The 25 Best Jobs in America?

Are Glassdoor's Best Jobs in America ACTUALLY Best for Women?
by Career Contessa
January 29, 2016
Glassdoor just announced its annual 25 Best Jobs in America...and we take issue.
Let's start with the basics. Every year, we look forward to Glassdoor's announcement and to seeing what positions make the cut, transcending above all the cube farm mediocrity to reach greatness. This year's list was no exception. It includes both some unsurprising positions, given that they offer high median incomes and copious amounts of creative freedom (Mobile Developers and UX Designers, anyone?) but also some dark horses, like Construction Superintendant. The number 1? Data scientist. 

In order to pick the 25 winners, Glassdoor based used the following criteria: "three key factors – number of job openings, salary, and career opportunities rating. These jobs stand out across all three categories." 

Sounds great, right?

HERE'S OUR ISSUE: 

What about the other factors that directly affect quality of life and personal fulfillment but aren't covered in Glassdoor's trio?

Sure, most of these jobs offer a median base salary of around $100,000 (the lowest, for a Technical Account Manager, is still a nice $69,548), and Glassdoor also awards jobs that offer clear opportunities for career growth. But is it always about the steady (and traditional) tick upwards, or should we consider some other elements these days? 

Evidently, Glassdoor's system doesn't factor in benefits such as health insurance, paid family leave, and professional development—elements that women (and particularly women millennials) value when considering next steps in their careers. Nor does it award points for diversity or jobs that narrow the gender gap.
Personally, we'd like to work for a company that may pay less but at least promises that pay is equal for women, guarantees your job if you take time off to have a child, or offers flex hours and work from home days to keep you sane.
Personally, we'd like to work for a company that may pay less but at least promises that pay is equal for women, guarantees your job if you choose to take time off to have a child, or offers flex hours and work from home days to keep you sane. Doesn't focusing solely on salary and promotion unfairly narrow our definition of what makes an ideal career?

We'd also love to know how many women work in these alleged top jobs. Sure, working as a Construction Superintendant might be an awesome position for those who do it, but how many of them are women like us?  

Not to say that these jobs don't offer some of those elements—we're just concerned that they aren't included in the official criteria. After all, these are the supposed best jobs in the country. We've got high standards. 

How do you feel about the list? What would you like Glassdoor to include in its criteria?