4 Things to Avoid Blogging About When You’re Unemployed
Job Search

4 Things to Avoid Blogging About When You’re Unemployed

by Avery Johnson
Photos Molly DeCoudreaux | October 07, 2015

IN THE MIDST OF A JOB TRANSITION, IT'S IMPORTANT TO TALK ABOUT YOUR EXPERIENCE HONESTLY BUT CONSTRUCTIVELY. WRITING POSITIVE THOUGHTS ABOUT THE PROCESS IS ENCOURAGING FOR BOTH YOU AND YOUR FUTURE EMPLOYER.  

Jobless? Whether this is a recent life change or you’ve been on the hunt for a while, you should stay aware of the way you present yourself online, especially as a blogger.

As a blogger, authenticity is an important value, but you should still set boundaries in terms of what details you choose to share online. {Click to Tweet} Each public profile and account you have in the digital space is an extension of who you are as an individual, and by extension, a professional. They’re out in the open for all to see.

Your blog is not the place to harp on your ex-coworkers and dwell on the negativity that was your old job.

If your website is linked to your social media channels or LinkedIn, it’s especially important to stay mindful of what you post. And while your blog may be a creative outlet and a space where you share your life with your readers, family and friends, use discretion when discussing certain topics. Employers may view what you’re posting as examples of your work, and they’ll certainly consider it a sign of your personality.

Here are four taboo subjects to avoid including in your posts while on the job hunt. 

HOW MUCH YOU HATED YOUR OLD JOB

If you were less than satisfied in your old workplace, your blog is not the place to harp on your ex coworkers and dwell on the negativity that was your old job.

Use discretion. Posts bashing your old 9-to-5 can sever ties permanently with former contacts and also reflect poorly on you as a professional, regardless of the situation. Potential employers want to stay as far away from drama as possible, meaning that chip on your shoulder could cost you a new job.

Choose to reflect on that time as a learning experience, and leave the angry details to phone calls with Mom.

WHY YOU LEFT/QUIT/WERE FIRED

Whether you left on good terms or bad, whether it is your employer’s fault or yours, the world doesn’t need to hear the details of why you left.

It is easy for readers to misconstrue stories, especially those who may not know you personally. Choose instead to share these stories with your trusted confidants or with your close girlfriends over happy hour, but leave them off your blog.

If you do choose to write about leaving, do it gracefully. Whether your goals weren’t aligned with your old company, you were looking for different opportunities for growth, or you saw yourself in a different role, you can find words to explain your decision with discretion and honesty, much like answering an interview question.

JOURNALING YOUR FRUSTRATIONS

If you find yourself unemployed, the day-to-day can rapidly fluctuate from exciting freedom to anxiety to boredom.

If you find yourself in a slump after rounds of disappointing interviews and no call-backs, it can be easy to slip into writing with a negative or frustrated tone — and your readers will notice. We’re not suggesting you just put on a happy face, but select your words and topics carefully when writing about your situation.

Spending hours each day applying to new jobs means you should use this space to build yourself up and show all you have to offer: your brilliant writing skills, creative ideas, and eye for design. This should be your space away from the ups-and-downs of interviews.

NOT BLOGGING AT ALL

When your entire schedule changes, it can be hard to stick with your usual routine. But instead of kissing your blog goodbye while you focus on finding your next career step, find time to write. {Click to Tweet}

Blogging provides a great space to let your creativity flow during your newfound free time, inspiring fresh ideas while you connect with supportive readers. Stay active on your blog and social media channels to keep these connections alive.

Let your readers know you’re on the hunt, and even boldly tell them exactly what position you’re seeking. By keeping these channels open, you create a networking opportunity that can connect you with someone seeking a new employee like you or who knows someone who is. Who knows? Your blog just may end up landing you your new job!

* * *

Ever make a major blogging mistake? Tell us about it below and we'll find you with the perfect GIF.