5 Things You Should Not Do At Your Office Holiday Party
Work + Life Balance

5 Things You Should Not Do At Your Office Holiday Party

by Katherine Nobles
December 18, 2014

HERE’S HOW TO MAKE SURE YOUR HOLIDAYS ARE FILLED WITH CHEER AND FREE OF MISHAPS.

The holiday season is a great time to eat, drink and be merry with those you love. It’s also a time to celebrate and mingle with your colleagues, as many organizations throw some sort of annual shindig.

While you’re celebrating this season (and hey, maybe even furthering your career!), it’s important to remain aware of the most common holiday party faux pas:

DRESSING INAPPROPRIETLY 

If this is your first year at the organization and you’re unsure about what to wear, simply ask about the dress code. Wearing something festive is usually appropriate, but be sure to avoid anything too short, tight or revealing. After all, this is a work event.

BRINGING UNIVITED GUESTS

Unless the invitation states that you can bring a plus one, don’t do it. Do not call to ask if you can bring an extra guest, and do not assume that you can bring someone (even if the invite does not specify!). Remember that the point of the event is to celebrate and mingle with your colleagues, not to introduce your new boyfriend or girlfriend to your work friends.

STICKING TO YOUR INNER CIRCLE

The holiday party provides a great opportunity that you may not usually experience at work—a time to get to know other colleagues outside of your immediate department or division. Take advantage of this time to introduce yourself and get to know these individuals better. For some, the holiday party offers a rare chance to interact with the C-level executives. Introduce yourself with confidence by providing a firm handshake and clearly stating your name.

DO: Use this opportunity to get to know other colleagues outside of your immediate department or division.

DISCUSSING WORK

This is a chance for you to mix and mingle with your colleagues in an informal setting. Don’t bring down the good vibes by reminding your coworkers about that impending deadline or the things still looming on the to-do list before vacation. Instead, come with a few fun topics in mind to keep the conversation flowing in a positive direction.

LEAVING WITHOUT SAYING THANKS

An event involving food, music, decorations and more takes a lot of effort and time to plan. It’s a nice gesture to show your gratitude to those who organized the party—make sure to say thank you before you leave!

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By avoiding these holiday party pitfalls, you’ll not only make a great impression, but you may also form new friendships with colleagues who you don’t normally interact with. Use this opportunity wisely to branch out, form new relationships with colleagues and enjoy the holidays!

Photo: Lee Ruk